Meatless Monday: Baked Broad Bean, Quinoa & Herb Falafels [Vegan & Gluten Free]

Healthy Recipes, Meatless Monday

Serves: 8-12
Yields: 40 falafels
Prep & Assembly: 35mins
Baking: 25mins
Cooling: 5-10mins
Type: Main meal, snack
Tools: Sieve, small non-stick pot w/lid, chopping board, sharp knife, food processor, mixing bowl, silicone spatula, veggie peeler, colander, measuring spoons, baking tray (*1-2), parchment paper, cooling rack

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins, Vitamins C, K & E, carbohydrates, protein, fibre, calcium,copper iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, zinc, and per serving is low in added sugar, salt and saturated fats. 

Wowzers, it’s been quite a while since we have created a new falafel flavour; about one year ago to be exact! If you haven’t tried them (our baked green falafels that is) they’re really tasty! …But why stick to just one flavour or theme?! 

This time we were inspired by a store bought falafel flavour we tried last year; by its overall theme and definitely not its taste. However this is not surprising as shop bought (refrigerated) varieties tend to be quite dry and disappointing; this is another reason why you should never shop on an empty stomach!  

This recipe is packed with flavour, moisture and the perfect baked falafel texture! We think that with the correct balance of moisture (aka, oil, tahini, raw veggies!) and seasonings, any flavour of falafel, even baked falafels, can be phenomenal; this is all the more reason to whip up a batch at home! Yes, we used a food processor to help throw it altogether, but don’t worry. Even if you do not own a food processor, you can still make these lovelies; it just requires a little more elbow grease and the compromise that your falafels will take a little more time to prepare and have a more rustic and homemade flare!

We enjoyed our recent love affair with this delicious M. Eastern food as four tasty lunches! They go perfectly with a salad, rice dish, or tasty tabbouleh, in a wrap or sandwich or as a snack with a tasty houmous, sauce or dip (try lemon and tahinipomegranate, minty yoghurt or avocado cream!) 

Some other good things to note include:

  • Our first batch had slightly more garlic, but we have toned it down in the final ingredients list. We also increased the quantity of mint and toned down the other herbs, but feel free to adjust the garlic, herbs and/or seasonings to your own personal tastes. 
  • The mixture is slightly forgiving to larger bits of ingredients, but with too many chunky ingredients, it might stop the mixture from sticking together. 
  • We made a huge batch…but you can always halve the recipe and slightly reduce the prep time as a result. 
  • The quantity of cooked chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans) is about two tins and the quantity of cooked broad beans (also known as fava beans!) is about two-three tins. If you are using a dried variety, soak about 220g broad beans and 210g of chickpeas overnight, drain and then thoroughly cook them before adding to the falafel mixture. NB: You can refer to our handy kitchen info for help with cooking times. 

Happy cooking everyone! 🙂

 

Ingredients
60g       Dried Quinoa
320g     Brown onion
10g        Garlic clove
100g     Carrot
30g       Fresh mint
20g       Fresh coriander leaf
20g       Fresh flat leaf parsley
480g     Cooked broad beans
480g     Cooked chickpeas
60g       Tahini
1tbsp          Rapeseed oil
2tbsp         Lemon juice
+++             Low-fat frying oil
8g              Ground cumin
8g              Ground coriander
1tsp            Dried Mint (*optional)
40g            Rice flour (or a plain GF flour)
1-1½ tsp     Salt
¼-½ tsp    Ground black pepper

Need an easy-print recipe? Print here. 🙂

 

Directions

1. Place 60g (about 1/3 cup) quinoa into a sieve and rinse it under cold running water for 30-60 seconds. Tip: This will help remove some of its bitter taste. Transfer the quinoa into a small non-stick pot. Add 140ml water. Stir together. Cover with a lid (without a steam vent). Place the pot over a med-high heat. Bring to a boil. Simmer and cook for about 6 mins or until the grains have absorbed the water. Remove from the heat and leave covered for 15-20 mins. Tip: Do not peak, not even a little! Leave the grains to steam and finish cooking off of the heat. Don’t worry if it remains covered for longer than 20 mins, it will still be OK!

2. In the meantime, peel and chop the onion into two halves. Peel and finely grate the garlic. Tip: A cheese grater is perfect for this! Wash, peel, trim off the top and then finely grate the carrot. Transfer the carrot into a large mixing bowl. Wash and dry the mint, coriander and parsley. Remove the mint leaves from its stem. Roughly tear (or chop) the coriander and parsley into two halves/piles.

3. Place the onion into a food processor. Process until minced.  Transfer the onion into the mixing bowl. Tip: If you do not own a food processor, just chop and finely dice the onion as best you can. 

4. Place the mint, coriander and parsley into the food processor. Process until minced. Transfer into the mixing bowl. Throw away any large bits of remaining stalk. Tip: Alternatively, finely chop the mint leaves, coriander and parsley (leaves and stalks). Mix the onion, garlic, carrot and herb medley together until thoroughly combined.

5. If applicable, drain and wash any tinned beans in a colander. Transfer into the food processor. Tip: If you have a smaller machine, complete this step in two batches (as we did). Add half or all of the tahini, rapeseed oil, and lemon juice (depending on if you have added all of the beans and chickpeas or not). Pulse for 1 minute or until almost smooth (like a really thick houmous); the mixture will still be a little ‘tacky’. Tip: You might have to stop and push the mixture down into the base of the container as you process it. Carefully remove the blade and transfer the mixture into the mixing bowl. Repeat this step until all of the beans and chickpeas have been processed. Tip: Alternatively mash the beans and chickpeas in a separate bowl with a large fork or potato masher.

6. Heat the oven to 190ºC/375F. Line two baking trays with a sheet of parchment paper and lightly spray it with some low-fat frying oil. Tip: If you are halving the ingredients, only one tray is required. 

7. To the mixing bowl add: 8g ground cumin, 8g ground coriander, 1 tsp dried mint, 40g flour, 1½ tsp salt and a few grind grinds of black pepper. Mix with a silicone spatula or large spoon until thoroughly combined. Fluff the grains of cooked quinoa with fork. Add the quinoa into the mixing bowl. Mix and fold into the mixture until thoroughly combined. Taste and season the mixture as necessary.

8. Gather a little of the mixture and roll it between the palms of your hands to form a small ball; about the size of a ‘ping-pong ball’. Transfer it onto the baking tray. Repeat until all of the mixture has been used. Tip: If the mixture is a little too tacky, lightly flour your hands with a little flour first. Lightly spray the ‘falafel balls’ with some low-fat oil. Using the back of a large spoon or silicone spatula, gently press down on them form small ‘falafel patties’.

9. Place the tray(s) onto the middle oven shelf (and if necessary, the lower oven shelf). Bake for 15 mins. Remove the tray(s). Increase the oven temperature to 200ºC/400ºF. Turn over the falafels. Spray with a little low-fat oil. Return the tray(s) to the oven; swap the tray positions if necessary. Bake for a further 8-10 mins or until slightly firm and golden. Remove. Allow to cool for 5-10 mins on the tray(s) before transferring them onto the cooling rack and/or serving. Tip: This will allow them to firm and set further (without drying out like they would in the oven!). 

Enjoy!

Tip: Refrigerate any leftover falafels in an air-tight and resealable container; consume within 3-4 days. Alternatively, store and freeze; defrost and consume within 1 month. 

 

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Baked Mini Tofu, Quinoa & Veggie Frittatas (& Parsnip Chips!)

Healthy Recipes

Our yummy baked tofu frittatas; originally posted last September! We’ve now updated the recipe and improved the format (inclusive of an easy-print recipe!). Enjoy! 🙂

Eat2Health Blog

Serves: 4-6
Yields: 12 Mini Frittatas
Prep: 30-35 mins
Cooking: 25-30 mins (*in a fan-assisted oven)
Type: Main Meal, Snack
Tools: Sieve, small pot + lid, chopping board, sharp knife, veggie peeler, baking tray, parchment paper, frying pan, frying spatula, silicone spatula, food processor, muffin tin, cooling rack

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins, Vitamins C, carbohydrates, protein, fibre, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc and (per serving) is low in added salt, sugar and saturated fats.

This is a recipe we developed earlier this year… but we’re glad to finally have the chance to share it with everyone!  🙂

Who says you need eggs to make a frittata or even an omelette?! Not in the Eat2Health kitchen! If you’ve got tofu, some shredded veggies, DF milk and grains, then you have the starting point to any great vegan frittata. Adapt the seasonings, vegetables and/or grains to suit your own needs and taste. You…

View original post 1,091 more words

Chickpeas and Amla Usli/Salad

Healthy Recipes

What a simple, nutritious and delicious looking chickpea salad! It’s packed with so many great flavours and ‘Indian gooseberries’; an ingredient we are not familiar with and are keen to explore! Thanks for sharing this great recipe Chitra; we can’t wait to try it! 

Chitra's Healthy Kitchen

Chickpeas UsliAbout:

If your chickpeas is cooked and ready – This is an easy, quick salad  that you can throw together in about ten minutes. It’s great for a quick lunch, served with crackers or as a accompaniment for rice. Although the basic recipe below is quite tasty. And finally, this little dish makes a lovely snack and a fasting food.

Health benefits:

Chickpeas are indeed very good for you, not least because two to three tablespoons equate to one portion of the daily recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables. Tinned chickpeas are fine, but fresh boiled ones are slightly higher in vitamins and mineral. Both are equally good sources of fibre, including soluble fibre which can help to lower cholesterol.

  • Yields-2-3 servings
  • Preparation time-20-25 minutes (includes the boiling of chickepeas)
  • Soaking time-overnight
  • Cooking time- 10 minutes

View original post 126 more words

Lentils Meatballs [Vegan & Gluten Free]

Healthy Recipes

Yields: 20 Meatballs
Serves: 5 (*One serving =4 ‘Meatballs’)
Prep & Cooking Time: ≤60 mins (*Dependent upon skill and/or kitchen helpers!)
Type: Main meal or Snack
Tools: Sieve, non-stick pot, non-stick frying pan, food processor, silicone spatula, small bowl, chopping board, sharp knife, baking tray, silicone mat, mixing bowl.

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins, Vitamins C & E, protein, carbohydrates, fibre, calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc and per serving is low in added salt, sugar and saturated fats!

 

Hi everyone! Here are some easy and delicious lentil meatballs that we made last November! 

So, the question is whether to use legumes or pulses?! Both make great plant-based meatballs, burgers, sandwich fillingsfalafels, koftes, meatloaf (more meatloaf!) and sausages (just to name a few!); all of which are tasty, hearty and healthful in their own right. However, we are still undecided as to what we prefer!

Which do you prefer lentils or beans? 

Overall, these little lovelies are great! The lentils, nuts and seasoning’s all provide a great meaty and savoury delight. Enjoy ‘a couple’ as a lovely savoury snack (perhaps with houmous or another tasty dip of choice?!) or as part of a healthful meal; with pasta, as a meze or in a wrap! We enjoyed ours with a homemade spicy tomato sauce and an impromptu (almost!) patatas bravas- we highly recommend it! 

 

A few good things to note include:

  • Process or finely chop the ingredients as small as possible. Any whole lentils, or large pieces of veggies will prevent the ‘meatballs’ from forming- you’ll have to them pull out and discard the culprit ingredient(s)! We had to discard a few lentils, pieces of herbs and onion!
  • The lentils make for a great ‘blank canvas’! Just adjust or adapt the seasonings to taste.
  • You can opt out of cooking dry lentils and just use a tin variety instead however, as you have a few other pieces of prep to do before the actual assembly, you might as well just cook some lentils in the background. The choice is yours!
  • Do not be tempted to ‘over bake’ them. Plant-based ‘meatballs’ will be never as firm as standard ones and a dry ‘meatball’ if just not worth thinking about!

Happy cooking everyone! 🙂

 

Ingredients

+++++++++++160g     Dried Brown Lentils (approx. 1 tin cooked lentils)
+++++++++++50g       Walnut pieces
+++++++++++2-3g     Cumin seeds
+++++++++++40g       Slice of Bread (1 slice) or breadcrumbs
+++++++++++140g      Red Onion
+++++++++++100g     Red bell Pepper
+++++++++++180g      Carrot
+++++++++++5g          Fresh Flat Leaf Parsley
+++++++++++5g          Fresh Lemon Thyme
+++++++++++2            Flax Eggs
+++++++++++1 tbsp    Extra Virgin Olive Oil
+++++++++++¾ tsp     Salt
+++++++++++              Ground Black pepper
+++++++++++ 2-3g     Garlic Salt
+++++++++++½ tsp     Asafoetida
+++++++++++2g          Mild paprika
+++++++++++20g        Plain GF Flour
+++++++++++12g         Sesame Seeds

Need an easy-print recipe? Print here. 🙂

 

 

Directions

Wash the lentils in a sieve, remove any seeds and stones and then cook them according to the packet instructions.

 

In the meantime, heat a small, non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. When hot, add the walnuts and cumin seeds. Dry-fry until lightly toasted/browned. Remove from the heat and transfer into a small bowl. Allow to cool slightly. Transfer into a food processor. Process until a fine mixture is achieved. Transfer back into the bowl.

 

 

If applicable, place the bread into a toaster or until a grill and toast. Remove and break it up into the food processor. Process the bread until breadcrumbs are achieved. Tip: if you do not have a food processor, toast the bread as hard as possible (without burning it) and then place it into a resealable kitchen baggie. Using a rolling pin, gently crush the bread to create your breadcrumbs! Transfer the breadcrumbs into the same bowl as the walnut mixture.

 

 

Wash, remove the stem and core and then roughly chop the bell pepper. Peel and quarter the onion. Place the bell pepper and onion into the food processor. Process until minced. Tip: You could also finely chop your veggies on a standard chopping board or grate your veggies using a cheese grater!  Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl.

Larger pieces will have to be chopped or discarded!

 

 

Peel, trim the ends and finely grate the carrot. Wash the parsley and thyme, remove the leaves from the stems and finely chop them. Place the carrot, parsley and thyme into the mixing bowl.

 

 

Drain the lentils. Allow them to cool slightly. Meanwhile, create the ‘flax eggs’. Place 16g of ground flax seed and 6 tbsp of cold water into a small dish. Mix until combined. Leave for 5 mins to set.

 

 

Transfer the lentils into the food processor. Add 1 tbsp of oil. Season with a little salt and black pepper to taste. Pulse until the lentils are mostly broken down and a coarse mixture is achieved. Tip: Alternatively place the lentils into a separate mixing bowl with the oil and mash using a potato masher or large fork!

 

 

Transfer the lentils into the mixing bowl. Add the breadcrumbs and walnut mixture, ¾ tsp salt, a few grinds of black pepper, 2-3g garlic salt, ½ tsp asafoetida and 2g paprika. Mix with a spatula until thoroughly combined (forming one giant ‘meatball’!).

 

 

Heat the oven to 200ºC/400ºF. Line a baking tray with a silicone mat or some parchment paper. Lightly spray it with a little low-fat cooking oil. Set aside a small dish with 20g GF flour and another one with 12g sesame seeds.

 

 

Gather some of the mixture between your hands. Tip: use a little flour to coat your hands if the mixture is a little tacky. Roll the mixture into a ‘golf ball sized’ ball. Dip and coat the ‘meatball’ into the sesame seeds. Place it onto the baking tray. Repeat until all the mixture has been used. NB: we created twenty! Place the tray onto the middle oven shelf and bake for 11 mins. Remove and carefully turn the ‘meatballs’ over. Place back into the oven and bake for a further 8 mins or until lightly browned and slightly firm.

 

 

 

Try serving them with some roasted veggies!

Baby new potatoes, celeriac and fresh thyme!

 

Remove from the oven. Allow them to rest on the tray for 5 mins before serving. Serve as desired. As mentioned, we went for a spicy tomato sauce and an (almost!) patatas bravas! Delicious! 😀

 

Leftover ‘bowls’ are great too!

 

Enjoy!

 

Refrigerate any leftovers in an air-tight and resealable container; reheat and consume within 3-4 days. As a guesstimate store, freeze, defrost and heat within one month; we didn’t freeze any of ours, these lovelies were ‘meal prepped’ and consumed within 3 days! If anyone freezes them, you’ll have to let us know how you get on. 🙂

Recipe updated: 19/02/16

Baked Mini Tofu, Quinoa & Veggie Frittatas (& Parsnip Chips!)

Healthy Recipes

Serves: 4-6
Yields: 12 Mini Frittatas
Prep: 30-35 mins
Cooking: 25-30 mins (*in a fan-assisted oven)
Type: Main Meal, Snack
Tools: Sieve, small pot + lid, chopping board, sharp knife, veggie peeler, baking tray, parchment paper, frying pan, frying spatula, silicone spatula, food processor, muffin tin, cooling rack

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins, Vitamins C, carbohydrates, protein, fibre, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc and (per serving) is low in added salt, sugar and saturated fats.

This is a recipe we developed earlier this year… but we’re glad to finally have the chance to share it with everyone!  🙂

Who says you need eggs to make a frittata or even an omelette?! Not in the Eat2Health kitchen! If you’ve got tofu, some shredded veggies, DF milk and grains, then you have the starting point to any great vegan frittata. Adapt the seasonings, vegetables and/or grains to suit your own needs and taste. You really can’t go wrong and you’re certainly in for a treat (these are delicious!).

Our plant-based mini frittatas are great for those on the go (breakfast in one hand and an energetic six year old in the other!) or those in need of one last, light and late summer meal. We recommend that if you’ve gone an hour to spare, double the batch and freeze them; enjoy for breakfast, lunch, dinner or a quick snack! 

We enjoyed our wish some tasty parsnip chips, salad and some of our delicious broad bean and spinach dip!  How will you enjoy yours?! 

Quick Foodie Fact (and woo-hoo moment)!):
*Based on 12 frittatas, each frittata contains about 1.5 servings of veggies towards your 5-A-Day!

Here’s to a great weekend everyone (just forget about the forecasted rain)! 😀 ❤

 

DF milk not shown here.

 

Ingredients
75g        Dried quinoa
170g      Sweet potato
1 Tin      Black beans*
+++++    (*240g;130g dried/cooked)
60g       Chestnut mushrooms (about 3)
100g     Red onion
100g     Green bell pepper
20g       Red Chilli
180g      Salad Tomato
1             Spring Onion (15g)
10g        Fresh coriander leaf
2g          Fresh flat leaf parsley
80g       Carrot
320g     Parsnips
+++++++Low-fat cooking oil spray
40g       Multi-grain bread (or GF bread)
12g         Tahini paste
1             Block silken tofu (349g)
125ml    Soya Milk (unsweet/fortified)
10g        Dijon mustard
1g           Sweet paprika
1g           Ground turmeric
2g          Onion powder
1g           Garlic powder (unsalted)
++++++  Salt & ground black pepper

Need an easy-print recipe? Print here. 🙂

 

Directions

1. Place the quinoa into a sieve. Rinse it under some cold running water for about 30sec to 1 minute (this will help wash away some of its bitter coating). Cook the quinoa according to the packet instructions.

2. Meanwhile, wash and cook the sweet potato. NB: Boil, steam or microwave it- the choice is yours (we quickly microwaved ours in some kitchen paper)!  Wash, peel and chop the potato into small chunks before boiling or steaming; boil for about 10 mins or until tender or steam for about 7 mins instead. Drain in a colander. Allow to cool.

3. Drain and rinse the black beans. Wash and slice two of the mushrooms; dice the third mushroom. Peel and finely chop the red onion. Wash, remove the stem and core and then chop the bell pepper into ½ cm pieces. Wash, remove the stem, deseed (if you prefer things less heated!) and then finely chop the chilli.

4. Wash and dice the tomato; place it into a sieve over a bowl and allow it to drain. Wash, trim the ends and finely slice the spring onion. Wash and remove the coriander and parsley leaves from their stems and roughly chop them. Wash, peel and finely grate the carrot (use a cheese grater!). NB: If you microwaved your potato, remove the skin and finely chop it into small cubes.

5. Make the parsnip chips. Wash, peel, trim the ends and then chop the parsnip into thin strips. Place them into a small dish and coat with your favourite herbs and/or spices and a low-fat cooking oil or olive oil. Season to taste with some salt and pepper. Tip: We seasoned ours to taste with some mild paprika, thyme, salt and ground black pepper. Toss to thoroughly coat. Line a baking tray with some parchment paper. Place the chips onto the tray in a single layer (you’ll be cooking these a bit later on!)

6. Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium-low heat. Spray some low-fat cooking oil. When hot, add the red onion, bell pepper, chilli and diced mushroom. Gently fry for 3-4 mins or until softened. Add the tomato and fry for a further 1-2 mins or until softened. Stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat.

7. Create some bread crumbs (unless you are using a store bought variety!). Heat your bread in a toaster (or under a heated grill) until quite crispy. Break it up into a food processor. Pulse into crumbs. Transfer into a large mixing bowl. Tip: Alternatively, place the toasted bread into a resealable kitchen bag; crush and press it into bread crumbs using a rolling pin or heavy tin…or crush it into crumbs in a large mixing bowl!

8. Preheat the oven to 190°F/375°C. Place the cooked sweet potato, black beans, fried vegetable mixture, spring onion, coriander, parsley, carrot, 12g tahini and cooked quinoa into the bowl of breadcrumbs. Mix until combined.

9. Open the tofu and drain off any water. Place it into the food processor. Pulse until it’s smooth and creamy. Tip: If you don’t have a food processor, place it into a large mixing bowl. Mash and whisk until it’s as fine and smooth as you can make it! Add 125ml milk, 10g mustard, 1g sweet paprika, 1g ground turmeric, 2g garlic powder and 1g onion powder. Blend to combine. Pour the tofu mixture into the mixing bowl. Stir until thoroughly combined. Taste and season the mixture as necessary.

10. Spray a standard muffin tin with some low-fat cooking spray or line each casing with a silicone muffin liner (paper linings are not recommended!). Tip: Rub the spray to coat all sides of the casings. Spoon the frittata mixture evenly between each casing. Top each mini frittata with a slice of mushroom.

11. Place the baking tray (with the chips) onto the top oven shelf and the mini frittatas onto the middle oven shelf. Bake the chips for 25 mins, turning once. Bake the frittatas for 25-30 mins or until slightly firm and golden brown (we baked ours for 25 mins). Remove. Tip: Leave the frittatas for 5-10 mins before serving (if you can wait that long!) as they keep firming up once they leave the oven. Also, use a palate knife or a butter knife to help loosen and remove them from the tin.

12. Make a quick and simple garden or green salad! Serve the mini frittatas with the salad and parsnip chips.

Enjoy!

Tip: Store any leftovers in a resealable and air tight container; best consumed within 3-5 days. Alternatively store and freeze; defrost, reheat and consume within 1-2 months

 

Steps: 1-5

Steps: 6-9

Steps: 10 & 11

Our Broad bead and spinach dip is making a sneaky appearance again! Yum!

 

Recipe and format updated: 25/02/16