Ingredient Conversions: Grams vs. Standard Kitchen Measurements

Handy Kitchen Cooking Tips & Info

We all have our own ways of doing things in the kitchen and for some it means abandoning traditional measurements and judging food quantities by eye. This can be a great skill to have and we occasionally cook for ourselves in this fashion. However, when you’re trying to develop a recipe for others, need to work our nutritional requirements and/or are still new to cooking, it’s a better idea to stick to recognised measurements. So for the rest of us, the use of standard kitchen measurements become an everyday occurrence by utilising our trusty scales, measuring spoons and/or cups!

Although we do try to keep things as simple as possible, everyone can still use various sizes of spoons and/or measuring cups and/or fill their measuring cups and spoons in different ways. There is also the fact that our American friends use slightly smaller measuring cups than us! However, these differences are so small that in general cooking it might not be too detrimental to the recipe, but may need to be adjusted in baking. So as you can see, things really are not black and white, especially in the kitchen. 😛

So with that in mind, we have created these tables that represent some average and approximate measurements and ingredient conversions; you’ll see some typical items we have previously used and some that we have not.

One thing to mention is that we always measure our dried herbs and spices with a kitchen scale and for that reason we have not included a conversion table here; sometimes our measurements work out greater than a standard measurement. E.g. our kitchen measurement can be slightly greater (+0.5 to 2g in some cases) than a standard teaspoon measurement.

However we will leave you with this tip on measuring dried spices and herbs instead!

Tip: Struggle measuring dried spices and herbs?! If your spoon will not fit into the mouth of your jar (yes, annoying)…why not try pouring some dried herbs (or spices) into a small bowl and then measuring it with your spoon! Transfer the remaining dried herbs (or spices) back into the jar with a plastic or impromptu paper funnel. Alternatively, just tip our what you need onto your kitchen scale and measure it in this fashion instead!  Also, to measure ‘level’ spoonfuls, top off the spoon using the flat edge of a knife! NB: Heaping means your spoon is slightly overflowing.

Although these tables are still ‘guides’, we hope that they will help you navigate through ours and other people’s recipes with ease.

Happy cooking everyone! 🙂

Tip: When measuring anything sticky or ‘googy’, try spraying your measuring spoon and/or cup with a little cooking oil spray first. This will help your ingredients slip right out and cut down on the number of sticky fingers!
Also, when measuring seasoning (and particularly salt), do it over a plate, never over your mixing bowl or pot of food- just in case your measuring spoon overflows! The addition of 15g of salt to any meal would be a disaster!
Tip: Unless you have a modern measuring cup that gages measurements from the top, place your measuring cup onto a flat surface to help get an accurate measurement of your liquids. 

 

Sources:
FSA Food Portion Sizes: Third Edition©2002
McCance and Widdowson’s ‘The Composition of Foods’. 5th Edition B Holland, A A Welch, I D Unwin, D H Buss, A A Paul and D A T Southgate. The Royal Society of Chemistry, 1991
USDA: Nutrient Database
Our kitchen scale!
Feature image: Measuring Spoons By: Rachel_Flickr

One Year Blogging: A Year in Review

Other

Happy ‘Blogiversary’ to us ! 

Unfortunately there is no celebratory cake, but that’s only because we are still working thorough Alex’s birthday cake from last week!  Yum! 😀

A delicious, homemade, raw, vegan cake… still defrosting at this stage!

 

It was one year ago today that we created our first post and now one-hundred and fifty posts later we decided to look back at that first one; an article discussing diet and exercise! It’s hard looking back at any of our first posts without being critical, but we should all embrace our previous experiences, learn from it and move on.

Initially publishing content seemed impossible; from battling with a one week, self-led crash course in WordPress (WP), inclusive of plenty of hair pulling and profanities(!), to the thought of having a published voice was, in all honesty (at least at the time), a little bit daunting!

We think that those that persevere and battle through all of WP’s ‘techy wizardry’, social media platforms and who generally take a leap of faith will agree that it is an amazing roller coaster ride, one that you cannot completely prepare yourself for!

Blogging doesn’t really come with a manual or person spec, although there are plenty of websites and eBooks to help with promotion and IT troubleshooting, it just comes with a learning curve. A right of passage which involves learning how to use HTML, SEO, analytics, correct tags and formatting, in addition to learning how to proof read like your life depends on it, the reality of how long it actually takes to create quality content and even knowing what direction you’re going with it. You will also (and most importantly) develop the ability not to sweat the small stuff, especially when it does not go to plan.

Anyone that starts blogging will start out with an idea or a ‘plan’, but what has materialised one, four or even twelve months on? Even the best intentions can change, but it doesn’t mean that we should give up on our goals. Our blog is our own. Our own creative outlet that we have decided to share with the world! We will all have different expectations and measurements for success, but the key is passion, hard work and commitment. Keep hold of why you started blogging in the first place. You cannot compare your progress to others, expect to have overnight success or even assume that your last three months of Google Analytics will be indicative of your next six. We’re pretty sure that we’ve read somewhere that about half of all new blogs give up after nine months; anyone belonging to this crazy ‘blogosphere’ could easily emphasise with this.

It you are new to blogging, please don’t give up! Inspiration and motivation comes and goes with the reality that blogging is hard work, but it’s also very rewarding! It can almost end up being a full-time job, but unless your blog is your business, you need to be realistic about it. Like all the other components in your life, it’s just one more to learn how to juggle and to find balance with. Our lives will inevitability encroach upon our blogging goals, but it might also help to inspire new ideas…which is fantastic because blogs continuously need new, genuine and interesting content.

We’ve really enjoyed blogging; from meeting new people, reading your guys fantastic posts, discovering new islands in the Pacific Ocean and having a lot of self-discovery, reflection and personal growth along the way. One bonus about providing food posts is that we can finally put all of our recipes in one place… instead of countless pieces of paper and notebooks! Yes, a virtual notebook that can also be used to highlight what we actually eat when we say to people that we consume ‘plant-based foods’ and of course the response is “so what do you eat?!” 😛

As you guys will know, Eat2Health encompasses ways on making sure you can make healthy and informed decisions regarding your health, as we all deserve to be healthy, happy and in control of our life. We’d like to thank everyone that has supported, inspired and joined us over the last year. We really love hearing about the things that you have enjoyed or how we might of helped you in some way; it’s priceless. There are no words to describe what you mean to us but we would like to reciprocate by saying that our door is always open. We always appreciate feedback and if there is a topic you would like to know more about (even about blogging) then please do not hesitate in dropping us a line!

We’d also like to mention that it’s been really interesting to see the search terms and the literature that has taken the most interest and maybe even resonated with you. Based on your views, here are Eat2Health’s all-time top five recipes and articles over the last year:

 

All-Time Top 5 Recipes

 

All-Time Top 5 Articles

 

So again,thanks so much for joining us for year one!  What would you like to see more of during year two? Please share your ideas below. We’ve got a few possible ideas in the pipeline and are definitely looking forward to another great year ahead! 😀

Happy blogging everyone and let’s always remember that when we put our minds to it, we are all capable of great things! ❤

 

1 Year Anniversary Achievement

 

Feature Image: Pink-birthday-cupcake By: ladybug-julie_Flickr

Broad Bean, Roasted Bell Pepper & Spinach Sandwich [Vegan & Gluten Free]

Healthy Recipes

Serves: 1
Prep & Assembly: ≤8 mins
Type: Main Meal

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins. Vitamins C & K, carbohydrates, protein, fibre, iron, magnesium, potassium and per serving is low in salt, sugar and saturated fats.

It’s Friday- so let’s make this post quick and tasty! 🙂

This is a great vegan sandwich (that admittedly we made ages ago) that is perfect for those lunch time slumps! We’re not just talking about fuelling you with postprandial energy (because this sandwich has loads of sustainable energy!), but for when you are bored with your regular lunchtime menu. #stuckinarut #samelunchforamonth !!

Planning is important to help create a well-balanced and healthy lifestyle (particularly one that you won’t loathe and that will continually develop your palate and cooking skills!)…

…but if you follow a plant-based lifestyle, this typically means that you will have to plan ahead (unless you don’t budget!?!) and really tap into your creative and adventurous side, so that your meals avoid becoming repetitive, boring and/or potentially unhealthy or just not nutritionally balanced! 

If you’re like us, lunchtime is the most difficult meal to meal plan, not only due to schedules but general indecisiveness! We can be creatures of habit when it comes to our main meals, but sometimes we really don’t know what we’ll fancy for lunch until the day; all the more reason to meal plan some decent eats! 

This sandwich can be prepped in advance and prepared on the day (or the night before). It contains our lovely and zesty broad bean and spinach dip (that also makes an awesome sandwich filling!). Add some beautifully roasted red bell peppers and delicate baby spinach; all layered between a couple slices of toasted multi-grain bread (delicious!).👌 Wash it down with a glass of unsweetened almond or soya milk and you’re good to get on with the rest of your day! #thatfridayfeeling

Check out some of our other sandwichessaladssoups or our vegan bites for some further hearty and healthful lunchtime inspiration!

Quick fact:

  • Per serving, this sandwich provides you with approx. 2.5 servings of fruits/veggies towards your 5-A-Day!

Have a great weekend everyone! 🙂

 

Ingredients

1           Roasted Red Bell Peppers, cut into strips
3T.       Broad Bean & Spinach Dip
1           Handful of Baby Spinach, washed & dried
2          Slices of Multi-Grain Bread, toasted (GF if required)

 

Directions (In Seven Simple Steps!)

  1. Chop the roasted bell pepper into strips (if you haven’t already done so).

       2. Wash and dry the spinach. Remove and discard any large stems.

       3. Place the bread into a toaster and heat until lightly brown and crispy.

  4. Spoon 2 tbsp of broad bean dip onto one slice of the bread. Spread evenly.

 

5. Layer the spinach over the spread.

 

6. Layer the strips of roasted bell pepper over the spinach. Spoon 1 tbsp of bean spread onto the other slice of bread, spreading evenly.

 

7. Place the slice of bread (with just the bean spread) over the roasted bell pepper. Slice into halves and serve.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Soya & Vegetable Spaghetti Bolognese

Healthy Recipes, Meatless Monday

Serves: 4
Prep & Cooking Time: 35-40 mins
Type: Main Meal
Tools: Chopping Board, sharp knife, sieve, bowl, 2* non-stick pots, wooden spoon

Notes: This recipe contains: Vitamin A, B-Vitamins, Vitamin C, carbohydrates, protein, fibre, iron, potassium and per serving is low in added salt, sugars and saturated fats.

‘Veganising’ a recipe of this nature was effortless! In no time at all we created a pasta sauce that is not only plant-based and versatile but most importantly, nutritious and delicious! If you’ve never used dried soya mince before and/or fancy something new for your pasta night, we’d thoroughly suggest that you give this recipe a try! It’s packed full of great flavours from a tasty medley of veggies and seasoning’s alike (hint: the soya mince is great at absorbing of all these tasty elements from your dish!), and a wonderful ‘meaty’ texture from the mince! Serve it over some hearty wholemeal or GF spaghetti and you’re good to go!

It’s good to note that:

  • We used some frozen veggies because we had some on hand, but feel free to use fresh, frozen and/or anything seasonal!

 

Quick Foodie Facts:

  • This meal contains about 4 servings of vegetables (per serving/*based on four servings) towards you 5-A-Day! 
  • The soya mince is easy to use, inexpensive and also a great source of protein! Check out some of other health benefits from soya products mentioned here.

Happy cooking everyone!

 

Ingredients

++++++++++++180g        Frozen Mushrooms
++++++++++++100g        Frozen Bell Peppers
++++++++++++80g          White Onion
++++++++++++8g            Garlic Clove
++++++++++++240g        Courgette
++++++++++++180g         Carrot
++++++++++++50g          Dehydrated Soya Mince
++++++++++++                 Low-Fat Cooking Oil
++++++++++++ 10g          Balsamic Vinegar (2 tbsp.)
++++++++++++10g           Lemon Juice (2 tbsp.)
++++++++++++4g             Herb Blend (2g of each: Dried Basil & Dried Oregano)
++++++++++++2g             Sweet Paprika
++++++++++++                 Salt & Ground Black Pepper
++++++++++++2               Tins Plum Tomatoes (800g/ unsalted)
++++++++++++40g          Tomato Purée (unsalted)
++++++++++++65-80g    Wholemeal Spaghetti (use GF if required)/person

Need an easy-print recipe? Print here. 🙂

 

Directions

  • If you’re using frozen mushrooms and bell peppers, place them into a microwavable dish. Place them into a microwave and defrost them. Drain.
  • Alternatively wash and prepare any fresh mushrooms and peppers to your own personal preferences. Prepare the remaining vegetables. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Wash the courgette, trim off its ends, slice it (vertically) and then chop it into thin slices. Wash, trim the ends, peel and then dice the carrot.
  • Rehydrate the soya mince according to the packet instructions. Drain. Tip: Make sure to follow the instructions to a ‘T’! We used about 150ml of freshly boiled (and seasoned) water; the whole process took about 7 mins.

 

In the meantime…

  • Heat a non-stick pot over a medium-low heat. Spray it with some low-fat cooking oil.
  • Add the onion and garlic. Gently fry for 1-2 mins or until softened.
  • Add the mushrooms, bell pepper, courgette and carrot. Gently fry for 3-4 mins or until softened.
  • Add 2 tbsp vinegar, 2 tbsp lemon juice, 4g herb blend and sweet paprika. Season it to taste with some salt and a few grinds of black pepper. Mix to coat.
  • Add the tin tomatoes and tomato purée. Mix to combine. Tip: Use the edge of your frying spatula or wooden spoon to crush the tomatoes. 
  • Add the rehydrated soya mince. Stir it through the sauce.
  • Cover with a lid. Simmer and cook for about 12 mins, stirring occasionally. NB: Leave the lid loosely covering the pot for the last half of the cooking process.
  • Remove from the heat. Taste and season the sauce as necessary. Tip: Tinned tomatoes can be slightly bitter; if necessary just add a pinch of sugar or sweetener to help balance out the flavours! Leave the pot covered until you are ready to serve. Give the sauce a good stir before serving.
  • Meantime, cook the pasta according to the packet instructions whilst the sauce is cooking. Drain.

 

Serve warm. Transfer the pasta into a large serving bowl. Ladle over the sauce. Tip: A drizzle of balsamic glaze or a scattering of fresh herbs and/or toasted pine nuts would make for an extra tasty finish!

 

Enjoy!

 

Refrigerate any leftovers in an air-tight and resealable container; reheat and consume within 2-3 days. Alternatively freeze in a resealable container(s); best consumed within 1-2 months, just defrost and reheat before use.